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On the other side of the bars: the broken families of al-Sisi's Egypt

  • Justice
  • Human Rights

CAÏRO - This year, Egypt is hosting the international climate summit COP27. An African first of symbolic importance, but international organisations like Amnesty International point to the serious abuses in Egyptian prisons. They see the Egyptian presidency as an attempt to polish the regime's image before the international community.

Across Europe, “revenge porn” victims are taking on digital abusers

  • Justice

It’s a global problem on the rise. Digital image-based sexual abuse – a catch-all phrase that includes what is often called “revenge porn,” but also deepfake pornography and “upskirting” – exploded across European countries during the pandemic, according to aid organisations.

"In Norway, Mia Landsem, 25, uses her hacker skills to hunt down digital abusers."

Syria: The hunt for war criminals in Europe

  • Armed conflict
  • Human Rights
  • Justice
  • Organised crime
  • Security

DAMASCUS - Every month, crimes committed in Syria since 2011 have repercussions on European soil and lead to new actions, thanks to the involvement of Syrian lawyers and human rights defenders. Mazen, Maryam, Anwar, and Hadi and many other defenders of justice and human rights track down suspected criminals, collect evidence and documents to bring these criminals in front of European courts in the name of the principle of universal jurisdiction.

Suicide in a Brussels police cell

  • Justice
  • Human Rights

BRUSSELS - What happened to Dieumerci Kanda? Six years ago, the Angolan man entered a Brussels police station to report his missing wallet. For no apparent reason, he is arrested and locked up in a cell. Three hours later he's dead. The official explanation is that he killed himself. But isn't there more to it?

After the Yugoslavia Tribunal: War Criminals Coming Home

  • Justice
  • Organised crime
  • Politics

BELGRADE - In this project a cross-border team of journalists sheds a light on how societies in former Yugoslavia deal with the past, by focusing on how war criminals are reintegrated in their home countries: a closer look at the results of international criminal justice.

Behind the scenes of the Belgian Special Tax Inspectorate

  • Corruption
  • Finance
  • Justice

BRUSSELS - A lot goes wrong with our tax collection. There are so many loopholes that the tax authorities collect a lot less than what the state is entitled to. This is one of the reasons why the government has to borrow and why we have a large national debt.

Facing the Future

  • Human Rights
  • Justice
  • Politics
  • Security

BRUSSELS - This investigation seeks to uncover the state of facial recognition technology in Europe. The journalists obtained leaked internal European Union documents that reveal law enforcement is lobbying to create a network of national police facial recognition databases. 

The bottleneck of the Balkan route

  • Human Rights
  • Justice
  • Migration

BIHAC - Western Bosnia and Herzegovina is a bottleneck for migrants and refugees who are fleeing across the Balkans. Many of them are caught en route to Northern or Western Europe on Slovenian territory, from where they are being systematically handed over to Croatian authorities in the last year. In Croatia, they are often exposed to police violence. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, where they finally end up, they are condemned to an interminable wait.

A migrant from Afghanistan in the camp Bira in Bihać, Bosnia and Herzegovina

The future of the International Criminal Court

  • Justice

South Africa is seen as the most western country in Africa. It is not being investigated by the International Criminal Court, but is however planning to leave it. What is going on?

Lack of statistics stops any investigation into corporate crimes

  • Justice

BELGIUM - Since 1999, companies are subject to appear before criminal courts for the crimes they commit. How often did this happen? When did it not happen? For what reason? What punishment did the public prosecutor ask for if the case did go to court? And what punishment did the judge pronounce?