Ismail Einashe is an award-winning journalist and writer who has written for The Guardian, BBC News, The Sunday Times, Foreign Policy, The New York Times, Frieze, ArtReview, and The Nation, among many others. 

He is the author of "Look Again: Strangers" (2023), a book by Tate Publishing that explores migration through the lens of art. He co-edited the volume "Lost in Media: Migrant Perspectives and the Public Sphere" (2019), featuring essays by prominent authors such as Aleksandar Hemon, Ece Temelkuran, and Daniel Trilling. 

He has won several awards for his work, including a 2019 Migration Media Award and the 2021 Investigative Journalism for Europe Impact Award. In 2020, he was a finalist for the European Press Prize.

Ismail is part of Lost in Europe, a cross-border journalism project investigating child migrant disappearances in Europe. As an Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellow in 2019, Ismail reported on China's involvement in Africa, focusing on Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Zambia. 

He is also an Ochberg Fellow at the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma at Columbia University and a member of the editorial board of Tate Etc., the magazine of the Tate Galleries. 

Ismail Einashe

Basic information

Name
Ismail Einashe
Title
Journalist and writer
Expertise
Migration, borders, human rights and international news
Country
United Kingdom
City
London

Supported projects

The Alien Fish Causing Havoc in the Mediterranean

  • climate
  • Environment
  • Fishing industry

CATANIA — Almost 1000 alien marine species, many dangerous and extremely invasive, are spreading quickly across the world’s fastest-warming sea, the Mediterranean.

An Unrosy Affair: How Europe’s Love for Flowers Is Exacerbating Climate Change in Kenya

  • Environment
  • Exploitation

NAIVASHA - Many of the beautiful bouquets sold across European markets have a devastating environmental and human cost. In Kenya, a supplier of 40% of the European cut flower market, the floriculture industry faces accusations of having a calamitous effect on water sources, of chemical use leading to disease, and of widespread abuses of farm workers, 70% of whom are women. 

The exploitation of Bangladeshi beach vendors in Italy

  • Exploitation
  • Migration
  • Trafficking

MONDELLO - Every year millions of European tourists crowd Italy's diverse beaches, visiting ancient seaside towns and bathing in the Mediterranean Sea’s warm, azure waters. But while some enjoy themselves among the colourful parasols and picture-perfect scenery, others are fighting for survival.

The exploited Bangladeshi migrants at the heart of Sicily's new food revolution

  • Exploitation
  • Human Rights
  • Migration
  • Trafficking

PALERMO – The Italian market for sushi has surged over the last decade and is now one of its most popular foreign cuisines. Sicily – which like many regions of Italy is fiercely proud of its regional food culture – has nevertheless seen a recent food revolution with sushi restaurants and poke bowl joints appearing across its cities, helped along by the lockdown surge in delivery culture, and the popularity of apps such as Glovo, UberEats and Deliveroo.

The Migrant Farm Workers on the Frontline of Europe’s Climate Crisis

  • Agriculture
  • Environment
  • Exploitation
  • Migration

CAMPOBELLO DI MAZARA –  Bearing the brunt of deadly heat waves and extreme weather, migrant farm workers in Italy and Spain are on the frontline of Europe’s climate emergency. While the media has focused on the impact of rising temperatures on European citizens, hundreds of thousands of migrant labourers in Italy and Spain toil away in 45°C temperatures picking olives, harvesting tomatoes, planting seeds, and irrigating crops. 

A High Stakes 'Game' - How traffickers exploit young Bangladeshis’ dreams of escape to Europe

  • Corruption
  • Human Rights
  • Migration
  • Trafficking

DHAKA - Faced with poverty and lack of opportunities, young Bangladeshis often dream of a better life in Europe that will allow them to provide for their families. Dalaals or ‘travel agents’ encourage and capitalise upon these hopes. Among those that take the risky journey to Italy known as 'the game' are hundreds of unaccompanied minors. The reality that greets them is often one of misery, exploitation, and slavery.

Lost in Europe

  • Migration
  • Trafficking

KOSOVO - In Kosovo a well organized trafficking network has started a big wave of minors who leave for Italy. Thanks to the Zampa law, which was introduced in 2017, they can get licenses to study or to work, if they report themselves at the Italian immigration services. The law was meant to decrease the number of missing unaccompanied migrant children, but it helps human smuggling in hand. "It's a company of 100.000 euros a month, but no one seems to care", says the prosecutor in Triëste.